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Thread: Just got a 1975 200

  1. #1
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    Default Just got a 1975 200

    Hi all, I've been looking for a Scout or IH truck for years but could never find a good one on the east coast. I just got a 1975 200 for $1000, 99600 on the clock and took the original bias ply tires, 2 piece wheels and tubes out. It seems to be a great heavy duty truck but it has a couple of quirks.

    How do I go about fixing the frozen shifter cable for the gas tank?
    Is there a trick to the 4WD? I keep getting stuck in 4L.
    Last but not least, how do I tell what engine it has? I believe it to be a 345 but I've been an AMC guy my whole life and never really owned anything else.

    I will try to get some pix up soon.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by spf150 View Post
    Hi all, I've been looking for a Scout or IH truck for years but could never find a good one on the east coast. I just got a 1975 200 for $1000, 99600 on the clock and took the original bias ply tires, 2 piece wheels and tubes out. It seems to be a great heavy duty truck but it has a couple of quirks.

    How do I go about fixing the frozen shifter cable for the gas tank?
    The valve is below the right front firewall, tucked up under the fender area. It's just a run-of-the-mill cable. Might be the cable, might be the tank selector valve. Once you have it apart, you will be able to figure it out.
    Is there a trick to the 4WD? I keep getting stuck in 4L.
    The t-case is a divorced NP205. It needs to be lubricated. Try changing the oil in it. Use straight 50wt or SAE90. DO NOT USE GL5 OR ANYTHING WITH EP ADDITIVES. THOSE CHEMICALS EAT YELLOW METALS.
    Last but not least, how do I tell what engine it has? I believe it to be a 345 but I've been an AMC guy my whole life and never really owned anything else.
    I will try to get some pix up soon.
    There are a few of ways to tell.

    1. Up above the fuel pump, right side of block toward the front, just under where the head meets the block, there is a pad about half an inch by 2 inches that has the engine size stamped into it. It's usually dirty and needs to be cleaned, and you need good eyesight. Available sizes in 75 were 304, 345, 392. If it has a 4 barrell manifold, it is probably a 392.

    If it is a 392, the water tubes go into the block after 71.
    If it is a 345 or 392, there are two raised points on the back of the block, next to the bell housing, behind the valley pan. They will be 8 inches apart. The 304 has the same points, 7 inches apart.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  3. #3
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    Thanks man.

    If I remember right the 304 that was optional was the AMC engine, correct? If so it is definately not a 304. The water outlet kind of snakes around 90* towards the passenger side before going to the upper radiator hose. It's a 2BBL from what I could tell.

    Got another question. It appears that it has a full float D60 rear and a semi float D44 front, both 8 lug. Is this correct? Was posi traction an option for these rigs? The rear end really chirps whenever I go around a corner tightly.

    I don't think the previous owners used the 4WD much. The passenger side hub sticks and needs some convincing to go to lock but is fine after that. The transfer case is shifting smooth now but 4LO is still kind of sticky. I will change the fluid and see what happens.

    Last but not least, the shift pattern from top to bottom is 4LO N 2HI 4HI, correct?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by spf150 View Post
    Thanks man.

    If I remember right the 304 that was optional was the AMC engine, correct? If so it is definately not a 304. The water outlet kind of snakes around 90* towards the passenger side before going to the upper radiator hose. It's a 2BBL from what I could tell.
    No, no, no. The AMC 304 weighs about 200 lbs less than the IH 304. Different in every way. The IH engine is industrial grade, designed for more torque, less top end, and a very long, hard life. It looks like the 345, only half an inch narrower on each side and half an inch shorter.
    Got another question. It appears that it has a full float D60 rear and a semi float D44 front, both 8 lug. Is this correct? Was posi traction an option for these rigs? The rear end really chirps whenever I go around a corner tightly.
    Yes, but I'd never heard semi-floater applied to a front axle. The inners don't have a pressed bearing, as far as I know, but maybe I just never thought about it before.
    I don't think the previous owners used the 4WD much. The passenger side hub sticks and needs some convincing to go to lock but is fine after that. The transfer case is shifting smooth now but 4LO is still kind of sticky. I will change the fluid and see what happens.

    Last but not least, the shift pattern from top to bottom is 4LO N 2HI 4HI, correct?
    I can't remember on the 205 what the pattern it.

    The front hubs need to be serviced occasionally. Pull them apart and LIGHTLY grease them. It is common for the hubs not to want to move. This is partly due to having stress on them. They need to be worked loose, and simply need to be kept free, sort of like your joints.

    There is a lot of routine inspection work that must be done on this truck. U-joints need fresh grease and a good yank. Brakes must be inspected for wear. You don't want to have to turn the drums, and you'll want to get your brake shoes trued when you replace them. It's just getting too hard to find parts. Replacing the rear axle bearings and seal alone is 200 bucks, and that's if you do it yourself, and you risk that every time you do a brake job. If you carefully pull the axle shaft, then pull the rear hub, you are less likely to have to replace the seal. Can't re-grease the bearings unless you pull the seal, though. See how it can pile up?
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  5. #5
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    I assumed the IH trucks used the AMC 304 only as I've heard stories of 401's ending up with these rigs for some reason. Thanks for clearing that up

    Thanks for the repair advice, I work for Ford as a diesel mechanic and get to play with F550's all day. A brake job for one of those rigs usually ends up getting pretty pricey as you need to do alot of the same aforementioned work. All part of being a heavy duty truck I guess

  6. #6
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    Still trying to figure out which engine I have...Found a clean pic of one online, where is this tab?



    Thanks
    1975 200 345 4WD
    8ft bed, 101K miles, snot green and no rust!

  7. #7
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    OK, found it. What do the other numbers below the displacement size mean?

    It's a 345.
    1975 200 345 4WD
    8ft bed, 101K miles, snot green and no rust!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by spf150 View Post
    OK, found it. What do the other numbers below the displacement size mean?

    It's a 345.
    Serial number.

    For those who have not seen it before, the thing sticking out on the side of the engine below the hole in the head, back a little bit, is where you find the engine size. Usually covered with grease. Two passes with brake or engine cleaner and a rag, repeat to pull residue, usually not hard to read in decent light.

    Notice there is no timing chain? This is not your father's oldsmobile.

    The 304 looks exactly the same. So does the pre-71 392. After 71, the 392 water tubes no longer went into the head (where that hole is) but into the block. They call this the Improved Cooling (IC) 392. Aside from block, heads, and water tubes, everything else interechanges, like crank, pistons, cam, intake manifold, etc. Gasket set is obviously different.
    Last edited by Allan E.; 08-01-2009 at 02:51 PM.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  9. #9
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    I've been wondering how they did the timing on these beasts until I saw that pic! Every vehicle I have ever owned has puked the timing chain, no worries here

    Is there a gasket where the metal tubes go into the water pump? I got a little bit of leakage going on.
    1975 200 345 4WD
    8ft bed, 101K miles, snot green and no rust!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by spf150 View Post
    I've been wondering how they did the timing on these beasts until I saw that pic! Every vehicle I have ever owned has puked the timing chain, no worries here

    Is there a gasket where the metal tubes go into the water pump? I got a little bit of leakage going on.
    They use an O-ring. Generally you can match them up at NAPA for cheap. As long as the pipes aren't rotted, you can just clean it all up and put it back together with fresh o's.

    By the way, if you end up pulling the engine or transmission, there are two freeze plugs on the back of the block and 4 on the back of each head.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

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