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Thread: Where to find parts?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    14

    Default Where to find parts?

    I am thinking about purchasing a scout 2 to use as a trail/camping rig and am alittle concerned with the availability of parts. How hard is it to find parts for these vehicles and where are the best places to find them?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Aiken, SC
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    2,423

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turnkyle View Post
    I am thinking about purchasing a scout 2 to use as a trail/camping rig and am alittle concerned with the availability of parts. How hard is it to find parts for these vehicles and where are the best places to find them?
    Parts are everywhere. Most of them, aside from engine and body parts, will fit other vehicles. Body parts are available from the light line dealers. Engine rebuild kits are available from several sources. The only part that nobody makes anymore that would be nice to have is the oil pump, but rebuild kits are available.

    The engine in a Scout is either IH made or an AMC 6 cylinder. If it's IH made, the parts for the engine are expensive. This is because IH did not make passenger car grade engines. They are industrial duty adapted to a light duty vehicle application. Too sturdy, over engineered for the application, hard as can be, but the trade off is that you aren't going to be able to make one put out 500 hp... as if.

    The transmissions are used in other vehicles, although the casings on the autos (chrysler 727) are unique to IH, just like big block chrysler is not the same as small block.

    The network is out there. The parts are available. However, the Scout is at least 30 years old. It will break down. If you know how to work on older vehicles, they're great to own. If you hire all your work done, buy something a bit newer.

    If you buy the scout, buy the FACTORY manual. www.binderbooks.com is a good place to start. It isn't cheap like a chilton or haynes, but it's 100 times as comprehensive, 5 times as big, and dedicated to the vehicle.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thanks. I am used to working on older vehicles. I currently have a 1979 f150 4x4 that I am trying to trade for a 1973 scout 2 with the 5.7 L v-8. I just don't want to buy something that will be a money pit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    95

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turnkyle View Post
    I am thinking about purchasing a scout 2 to use as a trail/camping rig and am alittle concerned with the availability of parts. How hard is it to find parts for these vehicles and where are the best places to find them?
    i find most things like alternators, starters, coils and stuff very cheaply at the local parts store to my surprise. starter with solenoid was 67, fuel pump 40 and coil 16. The truck is really easy to find parts for. Don't let that idea stop you. The only things specific to it are the body and tub metal, transmission housing and transfer case adaptor. Otherwise the sky is wide open and I actually have found it a cheap project compared to others. Get it man.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Once you have one, you'll look for others as parts rigs. Keep an eye on craigslist. Get involved with a local group (if there is one) and watch the forums. Parts come up all the time, you never know what you will find.

    I agree with Allan on his post and I have to second the recommendation to get the repair manual, it'll be one of the best investments you make (after the scout itself).

    Most parts are available as stated above from the major part houses. Be sure to have them check their hard bound books, the computers like to lie and state it isnt' available when it really is. The computers also do not have all of the correct options available, so if you get your hands on the book, you can find what you need and just give them part numbers (for MOST parts).

    Good luck and welcome to scouting.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thanks guys.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    eastern washington state
    Posts
    427

    Default a little advice

    find a good auto parts store that kinda knows Scouts my local autozone guy asked me who makes a scout.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    227

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by john breeze View Post
    find a good auto parts store that kinda knows Scouts my local autozone guy asked me who makes a scout.
    You'll get that at most of the autoparts stores now, regardless of who they are. The ONLY exception to this is if it is an older counter worker who has seen the vehicles over the years. The kids that are working there now don't know what it is unless it shows up in the computer.

    Take your time and help "teach" these youngsters into the correct ways of vehicles.

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