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Thread: Got the Scout home

  1. #1

    Default Got the Scout home

    Well, the Scout is in the garage, the girlfriend and I started cleaning up the inside. Looks like I have some real major floor pan work to do. I will take pics and post. My first question, I took off the gas tank cover and when I got to the straps, yeah, how difficult is it to drop the tank? This may seem like a rookie question but right now I am not looking forward to getting those rusty bolts off. What do most of you use as a good penetrant to loosen up rusty bolts?

    There is much work to be done but my first issue to fix is getting fuel from the tank to the motor. Right now it is rigged with an electric fuel pump in the engine bay with a gas tank to feed the motor.

    Stay tuned for more n00b q's. For now I am too tired to work on it, so doing research on here. Thanks guys, happy to be a part of the Scout community!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    eastern washington state
    Posts
    427

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    the gas tank is not that hard need a floor jack i use wd-40 and whatever is on sale a hf as for the gas tank its just 2 bolts and a few gas lines if you can mark the hoses so you know where the go back in.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    2,423

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    My favorite rust remover is PB Blaster. Pretty good rust dissolver.

    Figure on replacing any rubber lines, regardless of condition. I buy fuel line by the reel and keep it in the truck. There seems to be a need for it often. I can't even remember how many times I've had to Mickey Mouse a fuel line from a gas can into the fuel pump to get home. Tank selector switch failures, pinched lines, cracked pickup tubes or lines (sucking air bubbles, causing vapor lock) and failed mechanical fuel pumps (rig the electric!) have all occurred many times.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  4. #4

    Default

    Going to soak down the bolts today and see if maybe I can get the tank out dropped later this evening. Will take pics of the tank lines before disconnecting to make it easier to put back together.

    Allan, you suggesting I keep the electric fuel pump? If so I will probably just mount it inline on the frame rail with a piece of angle iron or something like that to protect it like they do with modern cars and their fuel filter. I need to search and find a way to have the pump be able to be regulated. Never tried something like this but assume it is pretty much a straight forward job with the right parts and tools, and know how...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    2,423

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    When I use an electric fuel pump, I do the following:

    1. Use a cutoff switch so you can manually turn off the fuel.
    2. Use a pressure regulator. You can buy them at the auto parts stores. You want about 3-4 lbs of pressure to that carb.
    3. Install an oil pressure cut off switch. That way, if your oil pressure drops to zero, your fuel cuts off. This is handy for if you get into a wreck. No sense in having a broken fuel line spray gas all over everything just before the fire breaks out.

    Note: I was in a rollover in a travelall once, and the first person on the scene was the guy who had been right behind me. He was smoking a cigarette in the tall dry grass. I was pinned inside. Nice guy, called 911 for me, but maybe not safety concious...

    The windshield wipers on a scout 80 work from the vacuum. There's a vacuum pump on top of the stock fuel pump. You need some way to operate them. There are ways to get vacuum. It is also a good idea to pull the wiper switches and clean them out. I always used WD-40, but I'm sure there are proper ways and proper lubricants. I just don't know what they are.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  6. #6

    Default

    I have a 74 Scout II, so I thought, so what you are saying about the Scout 80, does that work into my Scout? I have yet to take a look at the windshield wipers...


    Any place I can look to see how others may have converted their mechanical fuel pump to an electric? If it has been posted here, I apologize but just thinking out loud.

    Glad to hear his cig did not cause problems but you gave good advice about the oil cut off switch!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    208

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    I converted my rig over to electric, I can take some pictures of it tomorrow and post em so you can see how I did it. The short of it is this:
    1. Buy new pump from Kragen (they had the cheapest price at the time)
    2. Build bracket to hold the pump to the frame.
    3. Weld bracket to frame.
    4. Run a wire coming off of your Accessory power so it turns on when the key is turned. ( I used the heater fuse )
    ALWAYS PUT A FUSE IN!!!! I can't stress that part enough.
    Bolt everything down, connect fuel lines and your done.
    Total time for my conversion was about 3 hours and $40 for the pump.
    '71 Basterd Scout 2
    with a 258 from a '73 CJ5
    Intake manifold with NHRA markings....go figure

    "Its (scout) four-wheel-drive capabilities are equal to anything this side of full tracks"

    David H. Petraeus for President 2012

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks OKKool, I look forward to seeing your pics, and I will take pics here real soon of my project!! Promise

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    208

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    Sorry for the quality of the pic, took it with my phone. But the basic idea was I mounted it on the frame just foward of the firewall so I had clearance and no problems welding the bracket on. The bracket I made was just a simple little piece of angle iron that I drilled 2 holes in so I could weld the bolts in for the correct distance for the pump mounting holes. Makes life easy as hell, ran a wire off of my heater fuse with a kill switch wired in. The whole thing was just grounded to one of the bolts that it was mounted to since it was welded directly to the frame.
    '71 Basterd Scout 2
    with a 258 from a '73 CJ5
    Intake manifold with NHRA markings....go figure

    "Its (scout) four-wheel-drive capabilities are equal to anything this side of full tracks"

    David H. Petraeus for President 2012

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    2,423

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A.J. View Post
    I have a 74 Scout II, so I thought, so what you are saying about the Scout 80, does that work into my Scout? I have yet to take a look at the windshield wipers...


    Any place I can look to see how others may have converted their mechanical fuel pump to an electric? If it has been posted here, I apologize but just thinking out loud.

    Glad to hear his cig did not cause problems but you gave good advice about the oil cut off switch!
    I didn't spot which scout you had in the thread, so I was just covering as many bases as I could. The Scout II has electric wipers, not an issue on this thread.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

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