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Thread: SCOUT 800 - REAR SOLO FUEL TANK - Lets see photos of how you did it.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    66

    Default SCOUT 800 - REAR SOLO FUEL TANK - Lets see photos of how you did it.

    Hey everyone.

    I would like to see any photos of Scout 80's or 800's with a single rear mounted fuel tank. I want to see how they are mounted, where the fuel neck was placed and where the fuel cap was located.

    My 1967 Scout 800 has twin saddle tanks and I really dont like them. They leak, they're hard to fill (in Oregon we are not allowed to fill our own tanks) and trying to fill both tanks means spining the Scout around which is hard to do with a busy service station.

    I want to remove my two tank and have one solo tank mounted between the frame at the back of the rig, sort of like a Scout II. I know that there are new tanks & fuel cells that will fit in this space.

    So if you have any photos of a solo tank on an 80 or 800 I would love to see some photos of it.

    Thanks
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Although I cannot help you now, my Scout 80 will be getting such an upgrade in the coming months.
    While I am in Afghanistan, a guy in my local scout group is refitting my truck with a ton of upgrades. He has a build thread on BinderPlanet if you would like to check it out. "Project: Freedom Scout" in the "Binder Builds" forum.
    Right now we are focused on updating the drivetrain. After he finishes rebuilding my 152, T-18 4spd, D18/20 hybrid t-case and installs a Saturn OD. He will be able to focus on an EFI conversion and fuel tank mod. So far the plan is to us a refurbished 19 gallon Scout II tank mounted between the rear frame rails. Don't know where he plans to locate the filler neck and gas cap but he is an awesome fabricator. Whatever he comes up with, I am confident will be very effective, easy to fill, look clean and have a stockish appearance.
    Like you, I am very frustrated with filling the saddle tanks and would like to find a better use for the space they occupy. Future plans for that space include a storage compartment/speaker box on both sides.
    Don't waste money on a Scout II poly tank. Guy workin on my truck says they are crap and I have not had much luck with the poly saddle tank I hoped would help.
    They can work but aren't a plug and play option as one might assume.
    I honestly haven't seen a lot of S80/800 tank conversions. Not to say there aren't any out there but it may be hard to find examples.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    66

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    Thanks Radar, I'll keep my eyes peeled on the build thread.

    I've read lots of threads on people saying that they are fed up with the twin tanks, but none of the threads I've read (on this and other Scout forums) have shown off their solution.

    I saw one thread which had a few poor photos of a custom built tank mounted in the back. The tank had a side fill neck. They cut a circle out of the frame, welded in a pipe to try and retain the frames strength, added a thick plate of steel above and below the cut out and then routed the filler neck on the drivers side fender. They used a series of vent tubes and a charcoal filter too. But the info I've shared with you here is about as detailed as they got.

    At some point I'm going to knuckle down and purchase a steel tank (never liked the looks of the poly tanks)(Thanks for the info on the poly saddle tanks I would have never guessed) and meet the problem head on.

    Best of luck in Afghanistan.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Inyokern, Ca (it's a dry heat!)
    Posts
    14

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    An idea that might help you with the process: my Brother had an 800 with one tank only on the left side. Frustrated with the filler issue, he went to a boneyard and cut out the fuel filler door section of a late model mini-truck (not sure which one) and replaced the original filler cap with it. He's a pretty good bodywork guy, and was able to weld it in and finish it off nicely. I believe he then used a pre-curved section of gas hose to connect to the tank. Even though it's still the stock tank it has no filling problems. I've got the car now, and if I can I'll get a couple pics posted. This should also work for a rear-mounted tank.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    66

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    I went to the bone yard this weekend in hopes of finding a good filler neck for my single tank project. i measured many filler necks off of all kinds of rigs. I have not decided which to use yet, but there are lots of great possiblilties.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    CO
    Posts
    9

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    Has anyone considered a transfer tube/motor between the tanks? I'm picking up my first Scout tomorrow

    Fill one tank, flip the switch to empty that tank into the second and keep filling...? You could potentially remove the line from the fill tank to the motor, or leave it..

    Who knows I haven't even looked at the setup yet! All I know is only one tank is operable like I hear alot of..

    What filler issues are there with the stock tank? No baffling in filler neck, or overflowing?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
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    UPDATE:

    I finished my single fuel tank set up. here is a brief walk through.

    1. I compaired stock OEM fuel tanks to racing style fuel cells. Fuel cells lacked a side mounted filler neck. Most fuel cells have the fill neck smack dab in the center of the tank. I could not come up with a cleaver way of making the fill neck sweep over to the side without loosing ground clearance. A fuel cell would be idea because of the safety aspects. If someone can find a fuel cell that allows side fill, I would suggest that. fuel cells are also very square and easy to mount. I would have used a fuel cell if I could have found one to suit my needs and budget.


    2. I opted for an OEM tank. A 76-86 CJ7, Wrangler, Scrambler tank fit the area perfect. The Jeep tank had a side mounted filler neck which was justified to the corner of the tank. This was ideal.




    There were two different types of filler cap areas, and early CJ5 had a shovel shaped area...



    And later CJ7's and Wranglers had a rectangular style...
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  8. #8
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    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
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    I looked at both of these for several days and opted for the rectangular one.



    I purchased a JP1C tank. It is 15 gallons and has a 1" filler neck & a 3/4" breather vent tube. It also has two side vents and a third vent which comes from the sending unit.



    The added benifit of going with a Jeep tank is that they were cheap and Jeeps have rock pans to protec the tank.

    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    66

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    I swung down to a Jeep wrecking yard and bough the rock shield and the Wrangler filler neck.





    The hard part of this build was locating 1" fuel filler neck hose.

    A local hydraulic hose shop had just what I needed. it is a marine grade hose which is ruber but has a strong core of criss crossed wire. This hose can make super tight bends and not fold in on its self. Very hardy stuff. PRODUCT INFO - ALFAGOMMA (Italy) T-600 Marine Exhaust / fuel S&D 1" - USCG/SAE J 1527 TYPE B2. It is considered a Hard Wall tube. It is good w/ gasoline, diesel, bio-fuel and e-85 types of fuel.





    (Please note that these photos do not show the armor wrap which protects my hose from chafing, rubbing and road debris.)
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  10. #10
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    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    66

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    The tank vent tube are routed on the drivers side rear fender well. I wanted to go with a charcoal canister, which I will do this winter, but summer is almost over and I want to play.





    I hooked up the sending unit. It is a Dorman. 80-10 Ωs which means that I'll need to get a new gauge. currently the wire is there, but it has nothing to hook up to.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

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