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Thread: SCOUT 800 - REAR SOLO FUEL TANK - Lets see photos of how you did it.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
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    66

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    The old fuel lines were pulled and a new fuel line was installed. I routed it above the frame as best I could, to protect it from rocks and other junk. I can get to the unions and check for leaks easily.







    Now that my fuel is at the back, I'm going to be forced to route my exhaust out before my rear wheels.

    I'm keeping my old fuel caps in place to keep the old school look alive. But to keep gas station attendents from filling the wrong hole, I've added plates just inside the cap. These will be painted bright red so that they will know this is a dead end.



    Thats it.

    I hope this gives others some ideas on how they might do a single fuel tank set up.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Berea, KY
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    THIS is the post that I've been looking for! Thanks!

    For being a big issue for those who own 80/800s, it sure is hard to find a good post on how people have gone about solving the gas tank issue.

    Can you provide a little more detail on how you mounted the tank? It looks like you built something with angle iron but I couldn't tell for sure.

    Thanks again! Great help!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    208

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    I forgot about this thread.
    I am doing almost the exact same thing!
    We're almost done but you beat me to it.
    I'm a bit surprised to see it fit so well with your SUA.
    Nice work.

  4. #14
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    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
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    Wow, I've been away and didnt realize anyone had replied. I'll find more images of the job and I'll post them on here for all that are interested.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
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    My photos weren't as good as I'd hoped. It is a difficult location to take good photos. I dont have a lift so many of my shots are blurred or major dark.

    So I whipped up some drawings that will sort of explain what I did. This is more of the IDEA than the technical stuff. I just flew by the seat of my pants on this project most of the time.




    This is the frame area I mounted the fuel tank. Just like a Jeep CJ7.

    In fact most of the parts I used on this build are from a CJ7 or a CJ8 Scrambler.

    You need the correct gas tank, which this thread mentions.



    You will need the skid plate from a Jeep.

    You will also need the fuel tank straps, shown later.

    I fit the skid plate to the left (sitting in the vehicle) allowing some space between the tank and right frame for my single exhaust.



    I then build some mounts. These mounts were welded to the underside frame work of my floorboard.



    I added a piece of rectangular tube stock to the back of the skid plate. I needed this to give the fuel tank an inch or two of free space between the floor and the top of the tank where the tubes and sending unit are located.
    Last edited by ONE800; 05-20-2013 at 03:44 PM. Reason: spelling
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
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    This shows the front supports welded to the framework beneath the floor of the Scout. There is more frame work under the scout, but I didnt draw it all. This is a hard weld when you're laying on your back, buzzing undercoating and rust off, hoping you'll find a great place to weld. So bolting it in place might be smarter, I just didnt want any bolt heads on the floor of my Scout.



    So I tried to show how the tank fits into this mix of parts. Note the fill neck in my layout is located on the passengers side and toward the rear of the Scout. Other tanks similar in design locate the fill neck at different spots and are of different diameter, so pay close attention.



    Next up are the straps. The straps should have come with your skid plate from the bone yard. They dont require any modification. Tanks from the factory often used a strip of rubber between the tank and the strap. I cut old inner tubes and used them along the strap and I used a large mat of rubber under the tank. You should use something to insulate the tank and protect it from contestant abrasion. You dont need lots of cushy rubber, you dont want your tank to get loose if the cushion should vanish. I'd hate for you to leave your tank behind.



    The tank sitting in the skid plate with the straps in place.
    Last edited by ONE800; 05-20-2013 at 03:48 PM. Reason: spelling
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
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    Here is the tank firmly secured to the skid plate. And here is the skid plate firmly bolted to the Scout. All nice and snug.



    And finally here is the hole mess.


    There is no formula for a project like this. You'll find your own way to accomplish this goal. I think my ideas might give you some ideas of your own.

    I will never say that my idea is the only way it can be done.

    So far all is working great.

    My biggest complaint has to do with the fuel gauge and sending unit. What a confusing mess that subject is. I did research, read gobs of stuff, learned how it all worked, purchased a gauge and a sending unit that were suppose to work together. They dont really work that good together.

    When I fill the tank the needle is pegged. When the tank reads empty it still has 5 gallons in it. Its not the way I like to fly, But I have not had the time or energy to fool with more gas stuff.


    I hope that some of you find this helpful.

    It has made my experience at the fuel station a real breeze!!!! I love it.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  8. #18
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    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
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    I just wanted to follow up and let others know that this system has been working great. It is easy to fill. Other than the sending unit not being very accurate, I love the new single tank.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Portland Oregon
    Posts
    66

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    Here is a 1 year update:

    Over the past year I have enjoyed the single tank. Fueling has gone from a job to a joy.

    My only complaint is that the sending unit does not have a very long fuel inlet tube. So when the tank read empty it still had about 2.5 gallons in the tank.

    So I purchased some SUBMERSIBLE fuel line (Very important you only use submersible line. Regular fuel line is not designed to be soaked in fuel. The exterior rubber is actually the problem. It will swell, melt and leave crap in your fuel tank. Submersible fuel line is designed to exist under fuel and will not break down.) I added a length of fuel line to the fuel inlet tube and I also added a heavy bras tip with a screen. The brass tip helps the fuel line remain on the bottom of the tank.

    Then I adjusted (BENT) the fuel float arm, so that it reads empty with 1 gallon of fuel in the tank.

    One possible problem with my design is the fuel line tip being at the bottom of the tank. I might suck up crap. But that is what fuel filters are for and I have two on my machine, one before the fuel pump and one before the carb.

    So that probably concludes this thread. I'll check it from time to time to see if anyone has posted questions or comments.

    Keep on Scouting.
    1967 Scout 800 V8.

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