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Thread: Low temperature control valve

  1. #1
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    Oct 2009
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    Default Low temperature control valve

    So the old gal takes a good 15mins or so to warm up enough for her not to stall on me from a dead stop. Once she gets up to temp she does pretty good for the most part.

    I was looking in the Warranty Information book and there's the low temp control valve that is supposed to "improve starting and part throttle operation when the engine is cold"

    I'm wondering if by replacing this part it will help with cold starts?

    Has anyone replaced this and if so was it hard to find?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Little Rock
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    I had a flapper valve on my passenger side exhaust manifold at the collector that I took off when I found it was broke. After some research I found out it was an old way to heat the engine up quicker. The thing was broken and rusty, wouldnt close from rust/carbon. I was told they were more of a pain than a help. It was a bulky thing that seemed like it would restrict exhaust and possibly leak exhaust from the selector handle. I attached a drawing of what it looks like. If you're in a cold area, you could try a block heater. Hope this helps.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
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    Interesting. That wasn't the valve I was thinking of. This one looks like it mounts to the firewall and has some hoses going to it from the mainfold. I wonder now if that may be doing it as well.

    I live in Colorado and it's about 15 degrees with 6in of snow on the ground. I plan on getting the block heater as well.

  4. #4
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    Hurlburt Field, FL
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    Block heater would be my suggestion as well. There's no modifications involved in installing one; just route it into the lines going to your heater core. I have one for my diesel and it works wonders for starting on a notoriously cold blooded engine.

  5. #5
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    Oct 2009
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    Colorado Springs
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    You think a block heater will cure the problem of the rough taking off?

    She starts like a gem in cold. With the temp this morning she started on the first crank. Thing is (and this may be do to my ignorance) if I don't let her warm her up till the temp gauage is about half way when I try to take off she'll spit and sputter and unless I gun it she'll die on me. Once I get her warmed up 90% of the time she doesn't have that problem.

    Is it just because she's an old broad or something else?

  6. #6
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    Jun 2009
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    Little Rock
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    Out of curiosity, have you checked the timing and carb air/fuel mixture? Possibly cleaning the points (if you have em) adjusting the timing or fuel/air mixture could help you out some also.

    As far as the block heater goes, no I dont think it will improve your off the line throttle response. It will however keep you from waiting 15 minutes to heat up your engine. You might shave off a few minutes and possibly more when its real cold out. It takes me about 5 minutes to let my engine warm up in 65 degree weather half of that is at 1500 rpms. If I dont do this, mines dies off the line too and really dies when I put it in reverse. These engines were designed to operate under more extreme conditions than simular vehicles of that day and age. They are cold blooded, but built to last. I would start with the basics first. Check to see if anything is not set right or not operating correctly, before spending time on something that "could" fix it. The block heater is good to have in the cold though for sure. Good luck.
    Last edited by 73ScoutDude; 10-22-2009 at 07:04 AM. Reason: missing critical info

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Aiken, SC
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    Coonrods in Grant would probably have the flapper valve. It pushes the right side exhaust through the intake manifold, which warms it more quickly.

    You might also check to see if your choke is opening quickly enough. The automatic chokes on these old beasts are tempramental. You need to adjust it once for the cold season and once for the warm season. Sounds like it's adjusted for the warm season, not opening all the way until the engine is hot.

    A 195 t-stat also helps in winter. Heater works better and engine warms up to a higher temp before the coolant starts to circulate.

    Use the Robershaw style, 370-180 for the 180, 370-195 for winter if you go that route. I have found below freezing temperatures that I just like the way the engine runs. My fire truck (304) will not get up to operating temp below 20 degrees unless I am idling if I use the 180 degree t-stat. Just runs ice cold all the time, which means the heater is worthless.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  8. #8
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    Colorado Springs
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    Quote Originally Posted by 73ScoutDude View Post
    Out of curiosity, have you checked the timing and carb air/fuel mixture? Possibly cleaning the points (if you have em) adjusting the timing or fuel/air mixture could help you out some also.

    As far as the block heater goes, no I dont think it will improve your off the line throttle response. It will however keep you from waiting 15 minutes to heat up your engine. You might shave off a few minutes and possibly more when its real cold out. It takes me about 5 minutes to let my engine warm up in 65 degree weather half of that is at 1500 rpms. If I dont do this, mines dies off the line too and really dies when I put it in reverse. These engines were designed to operate under more extreme conditions than simular vehicles of that day and age. They are cold blooded, but built to last. I would start with the basics first. Check to see if anything is not set right or not operating correctly, before spending time on something that "could" fix it. The block heater is good to have in the cold though for sure. Good luck.
    Haven't checked the timing yet. That was something I was thinking. I want to put the pletronix (sp?) set up in it? My buddy has an old bronco and he said that was the first thing he put in there and it's run smoothly since.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan E. View Post
    Use the Robershaw style, 370-180 for the 180, 370-195 for winter if you go that route. I have found below freezing temperatures that I just like the way the engine runs. My fire truck (304) will not get up to operating temp below 20 degrees unless I am idling if I use the 180 degree t-stat. Just runs ice cold all the time, which means the heater is worthless.
    ---Or it's just plain too cold... lol.

    ---Yep, when I was in Michigan I plenty of times had to run with a shield (cardboard usually) covering the inside of the grille (not the radiator) for the 195 to give me heat, but that was with a shroud and a 7-blade fan.

    ---I have not gotten around to calling Mr. Gasket to see what's up, but next time I call Prestolite Drive I will have them transfer my call before I hang up.
    That 195 may or may not be available now, but with a wind screen over the grille, the 180 will give adequate heat. LOL, the old Bridgeport boxes I have, as you may know already, have XHT for Extremely High Temp (winter use only) for the 195, HT (High Temp) for the 180. The 160 just has 160 on the box IIRC.

    ---Yes, block heater would work because you are bringing the coolant closer to OpTemp, which brings the oil closer to OpTemp, which makes the truck think it was covered in a blanket all night and started at 3am so it had time to warm up. Won't make the seats or steering wheel any warmer when you get in to start it up though.
    ---Thank you,
    -T.R.E.Jr. (Fortiter Et Recte & Soyez Sage)

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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rascus View Post
    Haven't checked the timing yet. That was something I was thinking. I want to put the pletronix (sp?) set up in it? My buddy has an old bronco and he said that was the first thing he put in there and it's run smoothly since.
    ---Just make sure all your grounds are good. It doesn't matter if you put $10k in space-aged, aftermarket ignition components in it, if the grounds are bad, you'll burn somethin up.

    ---A lot of aftermarket companies frown at us IHers cause they think all our trucks are rusty and that's why the modules fail. IIRC, it was on Pertronix's site that they posted a message similar to my warning. Mallory has had a few complaints and kickers, but they offer products to protect their modules, yet don't deny grounds are crucial & have mentioned grounds many times in their Technical Knowledgebase.
    ---Thank you,
    -T.R.E.Jr. (Fortiter Et Recte & Soyez Sage)

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