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Thread: 67 Traveall axles swap

  1. #1
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    Default 67 Traveall axles swap

    Someone has offered to give me a 70s Dana 44 front end with a Detroit locker and a Dana 60 rear end, both out of a Dodge from the 70s. The front even has disk breaks. I am going to get the particulars on the axles today, but he said they should swap right in. I am guessing that it won't be that easy. I plan on using a transfer case and drive shafts out of a 1968 Travelall.

    Basically my questions are as follows. Is this possible? If so, has anyone here done this? What information about the axles do I need to get to help tell if this is possible? Also, the front end is full time 4x4. I don't drive the thing more than a couple of miles a day and all the parts are free so are there any concern with this?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Yes, it's more than possible. Scouts/travelalls aren't as wide as other trucks of that era though, so you'll most likely have to shorten them both down to fit under it, unless you want to be riding with much wider axles than stock. You'll also have to put on new spring perches for the suspension. If you've got the driveshafts figured out then that should be most of the problems you'll run across.

  3. #3
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    To shorten the axles, I take that some place and have it done right or is it something that is possible to do myself? I am trying to avoid putting to much money into to this, as I can get the dana 44 off the 68 I took the transfer case from. The problem with that is I want to get away from this odd lug pattern and split rims on the IH Dana 60 and 44 in the Travelalls. It sounds like it may be just as easy to get the Dana 44 frontend form the Travelall and just have custom wheels made for it.

    Do you happen to know what the axle lenght is on a 1967 Traveall, I cannot seem to locate it.

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
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    I've seen it done in garages before without taking them to specialists, but can't remember everything that's involved with shortening them. I don't know the width of the axles off hand, either.

  5. #5
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    The dodge front axle should bolt right in. The steering linkage may be an issue. Travelall axles are wider than scouts, and the dodge are comparable.

    I don't know about the rear spring perches. I only have worried about the fronts.

    All the spring perch widths on travelalls from C and D series are the same in the front. The rear changed in 74.

    This is a good swap. I suggest you go ahead with it. You may have to move the rear spring perches. Not a big deal. The real issue is the brakes. You will need to swap the master cylinder and proportioning valve from a later unit. I suggest a late 70s chevy or dodge pickup might be a fit. If so, cheap and easy solution. The plunger rod might need some custom work, or you might just be able to use the one from the IH.

    Save the IH master cylinder if it is good. They are getting hard to find, and expensive as a result. Somebody will need it.

    If you have good brake drums on the 67, especially the 6 lug pattern, sell them. Do not throw them away. They are nearly impossible to find. If you don't want to mess with them right now, wrap them up for later, or just let me know. I'll drive over and take them off your hands.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  6. #6
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    I think I will grab the axles, in the worse case I am sure someone else can use them.

    I do know little about steering. If the steering linkage was an issue, how would I deal with that? Should I grab te likage off the Dodge? I can basically have anything off of it I want so I will grab whatever I can maybe use.

    My brake drums are in excellent shape and the master cylinder probably only has about 300 miles worth of use. Would I be able to use the power brake booster from the interntional or would I grab that whereever I get the maste cylinder from?

    My Travelall is a daily driver and I am tryign to avoid getting to a point of almost having it done and then having to wait a while to figureout how to get it to work. Well, that and I don't have a garage so trying to avoid working in the rocks, mud and rain for more than 2 or 3 days

    Thanks Alan.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by damnesia View Post
    I think I will grab the axles, in the worse case I am sure someone else can use them.

    I do know little about steering. If the steering linkage was an issue, how would I deal with that? Should I grab te likage off the Dodge? I can basically have anything off of it I want so I will grab whatever I can maybe use.

    My brake drums are in excellent shape and the master cylinder probably only has about 300 miles worth of use. Would I be able to use the power brake booster from the interntional or would I grab that whereever I get the maste cylinder from?

    My Travelall is a daily driver and I am tryign to avoid getting to a point of almost having it done and then having to wait a while to figureout how to get it to work. Well, that and I don't have a garage so trying to avoid working in the rocks, mud and rain for more than 2 or 3 days

    Thanks Alan.
    Use the master cylinder from the donor vehicle if you can. Boosters are specific to master cylinders. Easiest way to be sure there is a match. Obviously, the mounting holes are different. If the actuating rod is too long, maybe not a big deal, because you can fab up a mounting bracket. Just keep in mind, disc and drum are different, front only disc is different than front and rear disc, too. Don't forget to snag the proportioning valve. They are expensive and hard to find, and it's easier than buying an adjustable one. LOOK to see which is front, which is back, both for the master cylinder and the prop valve. Trust me, you don't want to hook it up backwards. Troubleshooting something like that will drive you insane.

    The drag link on the IH is pretty simple. You have to look at the knuckle and see how the donor truck works. It is far easier to pull the whole axle with the attached parts, then compare when you have it mounted.

    Chances are it will be similar in the linkage, but not the same type of steering box, and if you can upgrade, you might want to go that route. The 67 power steering is a ram assist style, not an integral box like the 68 and later pickup/t-all or the scouts. If you can pull the whole steering box and pump, you will probably be better off, even if they don't fit, because it will give you a basis for comparison. Some mount or work backwards from others, and you still have to make sure input and output shafts are of a useable size.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  8. #8
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    I got the axles today. Dana 44 from and Dana 60 rear, out of 1976 Dodge D250 Adventurer with all the brake pieces.

    My first concern is that the axles are SOA from the factory. This doesn't actually look like it will be a problem but I wanted see if there are any caveats I should be aware of. I guess it will lift the Traveall 3 or 4 inches which I am not necessarily thrilled about but its a small trade-off for disk brakes.

  9. #9
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    If you are using an 1100 or 1200 travelall, the axle swap will not lift the travelall at all. A 4x4 travelall came stock with a spring over. The 2wd sits lower than the 4wd travelall, so doing a conversion would lift the vehicle no matter what. That's because you switch from a bent axle to a straight axle, and then the rear perches get raised to compensate for the front.

    The travelall also has positive arched springs compared to a chevy pickup or suburban. For this reason, it rides slightly higher.

    I don't see any reason why you would have a ride higher than a stock 4x4 travelall with a simple axle change, but if you really want to lower it, change the springs. I prefer a higher ride with a 4x4 simply because I like the clearance in mud or snow. When there is 5 inches of snow on the ground, being able to use taller snow tires is a plus. A 1200 travelall will take 33" tires with no problem. You can go with 32" on an 1100. The only difference is springs in this regard.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

  10. #10
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    ok, for some reason I thought the 1200 Travelall had SUA but I hven't been under it in a while and am probably just remembering the setup on my Scout.

    I don't mind having it a little higher but didn't want to gain like 4 or 5 inches. However, if I did want to lift it a little more, where would I find the lift kits? I can't seem to locate any for a 67 Travelall.

    Thanks again Allan.

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