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Thread: Broken Pushrod

  1. #1

    Default Broken Pushrod

    I have a 1980 Scout II 345 that has a fairly loud top end tick but runs reasonably well. I pulled the valve covers to investigate and found a broken intake pushrod on cylinder seven and it's lifter laying in the valley. The lifter and cam lobe looked to be in good shape, so I replaced all the pushrods and ran it. The tick is now gone and it runs well, but the rocker arm for the exhaust valve only moves a very small amount compared to all the others. I also noticed after the fact the valve tip on the number seven exhaust valve is protruding from the retainer a little more than the others Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Rock Island TN.
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Well either your lifter is collapsed or your cam is going flat. As for the tip on the valve being higher, most likely the seat is a little beat in and possibly broken. Either way your looking at some work and money. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, Paul
    Black Smoke Customs is now open in Rock Island, Tennessee. We are addicted to International's and Cummins B series motors. The only thing we don't do is paint and body,,,yet.
    We support ASE Certification.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Aiken, SC
    Posts
    2,423

    Default

    My guess is that you have a sticky valve. You can pull the lifter with a tool specifically made for the purpose. Runs about 25 bucks at NAPA. At that time, you can at least eyeball the cam.

    I would replace the lifter and the push rod and then look to see how it acts.

    Best guess is that you will need to pull the heads (do them both, too much of a pain to pull a head to not do both) and have a valve job done. Can't fix a sticky valve without pulling the head, and at that point, you do them all unless it's fresh work already under warranty.

    You may find that it's time to change the cam as well. If that happens, DO NOT try to replace it while in the vehicle. The rear cam bearing alignment is the essence of the SV engine assembly. You must install the cam bearings perfectly, and there is a plate on the back of the engine so that you can do it from behind.
    Allan E.
    Curmudgeon Extraordinaire
    Charter Member, Old Hippie IH Club
    Old fashioned binder freak

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